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Boris Ilyin
Boris Ilyin

Import Csv To Sql Server C Net Download [BEST]



To start the SQL Server Import and Export Wizard using SSMS, go to Object Explorer, right click on a database for which want to export or import data; from the context menu under the Task sub-menu, choose the Import Data or Export Data option:




import csv to sql server c net download



Note: If you are work with multiple servers or on a network, it is better to enter the name of the server instead to expand the combo box, because it may take a long time to list all available servers and it can cause the Not Responding state:


From the name of the provider, it can be determined which destination the provider is intended for. For example, the Microsoft Access (Microsoft Access Database Engine) provider is intended to import data to Microsoft Access, the .Net Farmworker Data Provider for Oracle is for importing the Oracle database, etc.


By default, the Run immediately option for the import and export data immediately is checked. To save the settings as the SSIS package, the Save SSIS Package check box needs to be checked.


If you've ever tried to use PowerShell's Import-CSV with large files, you know that it can exhaust all of your RAM. Previously, I created a script on ScriptCenter that used an alternative technique to import large CSV files, and even imported them into SQL Server at a rate of 1.7 million rows a minute. I've now gotten that number up to a massive 3.2 million rows a minute 5.35 million rows a minute for non-indexed tables and 2.6 million rows a minute 4.35 million rows a minute for tables with clustered indexes.


Two of the fastest ways to import data is to use bcp or SqlBulkCopy. BCP is finicky, and requires a separate download. My intention is to create a script that can be used on any machine running PowerShell v3 and above, so these scripts will be using SqlBulkCopy. The catch is that SqlBulkCopy.WriteToServer() requires a Datatable, Datarow, or IDataReader as input. This means your plain-text CSV data must be transformed into one of these objects prior to being passed to WriteToServer().


In order to avoid having to specify column names each time you import a new CSV, the SQL table column order and CSV column order must be the same. If you need to rearrange your columns, I suggest creating a view and importing to the view.


If you're wondering why batching was used, it's because the datatable seems to get exponentially slower as it grows above a few hundred thousand rows. I actually wasn't able to import all 9 million rows into the datatable before my memory was exhausted. I tested various batch sizes, and 50k worked best for me.


There are a number of tools that can be used to import CSV files into SQL Server. If you're looking to use PowerShell, the StreamReader will give you the fastest results, but if your code has embedded delimiters, this may not be the method for you. Using OleDBConnection is a powerful, fast way to import entire CSVs or subsets of CSV data, but requires the use of an x86 shell, unless you download the Microsoft Access Database Engine 2010 Redistributable which provides a 64-bit text driver. Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.TextFieldParser is slower, but works in 64-bit and processes embedded delimiters well.


You are probably wondering why you would want to export data to a CSV file. First, the CSV file (.csv) is a very popular data format, accepted by many applications like Excel, Calc, various IDEs, and database servers. In addition, it has a very simple structure, because the characteristic features are values in rows separated by commas.


The popularity and the wide acceptance of this format allow for the exchange of data between different platforms and applications. You can export data from one database and import them into other software like Excel.


This independence also allows moving data between different operating systems like Windows and Linux. A lot of programs have an option to export and import from/to CSV files for this reason. Companies working with data on different platforms can operate on the same data and move data by using the CSV format to import and export.


Fill other fields like the name of the server, login, and password to the server, and choose the database storing the table you would like to export (our table product is in the database store):


The first option is -S, followed by the name of the server, a backslash, the name of the SQL Server instance, a comma, and the port number for the connection. In my case, SQL Server is on a machine called DESKTOP-INGEKE8, and the instance is MSSQLSERVER. Note that the default port is 1433.


Next is the option -S, followed by the name of the server, a backslash, the name of the SQL Server instance, a comma, and the port number for the connection. In my case, SQL Server is on a machine called DESKTOP-INGEKE8, and the instance is MSSQLSERVER. Note that the default port is 1433.


Microsoft Scripting Guy, Ed Wilson, is here. I was chatting this week with Microsoft PowerShell MVP, Chad Miller, about the series of blogs I recently wrote about using CSV files. He thought a helpful addition to the posts would be to talk about importing CSV files into a SQL Server. I most heartily agreed. Welcome to Guest Blogger Week. We will start off the week with a bang-up article by Chad Miller. Chad has previously written guest blogs for the Hey, Scripting Guy! Blog. Here is a little information about Chad:


A CSV (Comma Separated Values) file is a special type of file that you can create or edit in Excel. Rather than storing information in columns, CSV files store information separated by commas. When text and numbers are saved in a CSV file, it's easy to move them from one program to another. For example, you can export your contacts from Google into a CSV file, and then import them to Outlook.


When you export your contacts from another program, for example, from Gmail, you can usually select one of several formats. Gmail offers you the choice of a Google CSV file, an Outlook CSV file, or vCards. When exporting from one Outlook profile to import into another profile, you can choose to export into a Comma Separated Values file or an Outlook Data File (.pst).


In Excel, go to File > Open > and then navigate to the .csv file you just downloaded to your computer. To find the .csv file, be sure to look at All Files. Click on the .csv file to open it.


Save the file with a new name as a CSV file type (.csv). If you use Excel to work in the file, when you save it, Excel will prompt you a few times with "are you sure you want to save it in CSV format?" Always choose Yes. If you choose No, the file will be saved in Excel's native format (.xlsx) and Outlook won't be able to use it to import data.


When you save it, Excel will prompt you a few times with "are you sure you want to save it in CSV format?" Always choose Yes. If you choose No, the file will be saved in Excel's native format (.xlsx) and it won't work for importing into Outlook.


This importer supports fields spanning multiple lines. The only restriction is that they must be quoted, otherwise it would not be possible to distinguish between malformed data and multi-line values.


Specifies the SQL table or view where CSV will be imported into.If a table name is not specified, the table name will be automatically determined from the filename.If the table specified does not exist and -AutoCreateTable, it will be automatically created using slow and inefficient but accommodating data types.If the automatically generated table datatypes do not work for you, please create the table prior to import.If you want to import specific columns from a CSV, create a view with corresponding columns.


Specifies the schema in which the SQL table or view where CSV will be imported into resides. Default is dbo.If a schema does not currently exist, it will be created, after a prompt to confirm this. Authorization will be set to dbo by default.This parameter overrides -UseFileNameForSchema.


If this switch is enabled, the SqlBulkCopy option to allow insert triggers to be executed will be used.Per Microsoft "When specified, cause the server to fire the insert triggers for the rows being inserted into the database."


If this switch is enabled, the script will try to find the schema name in the input file by looking for a period (.) in the file name.If used with the -Table parameter you may still specify the target table name. If -Table is not used the file name after the first period willbe used for the table name.For example test.data.csv will import the csv contents to a table in the test schema.If it finds one it will use the file name up to the first period as the schema. If there is no period in the filename it will default to dbo.If a schema does not currently exist, it will be created, after a prompt to confirm this. Authorization will be set to dbo by default.This behaviour will be overridden if the -Schema parameter is specified.


For transfer of data between SQL servers, in place of -c, use -n or -N for native data format (-N = Unicode). This is much faster and avoids data conversion problems. Please refer to the previous BOL link for the complete format of the BCP command.


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8 Ways to Export SQL Results To a Text File Daniel Calbimonte, 2017-10-06 (first published: 2016-10-26)


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