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Boris Ilyin
Boris Ilyin

The Cabin In The Woods(2011)



The Cabin in the Woods is a 2012 science fiction[4] comedy horror film directed by Drew Goddard in his directorial debut, produced by Joss Whedon, and written by Whedon and Goddard.[5] It stars Kristen Connolly, Chris Hemsworth, Anna Hutchison, Fran Kranz, Jesse Williams, Richard Jenkins, and Bradley Whitford. The plot follows a group of college students who retreat to a remote forest cabin where they fall victim to a variety of monsters while technicians manipulate events from an underground facility.




The Cabin in the Woods(2011)


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American college students Dana Polk, Jules Louden, Curt Vaughan, Holden McCrea, and Marty Mikalski are spending their weekend at Curt's cousin's cabin in the forest. From the lab, Sitterson and Hadley remotely control the cabin and manipulate the students by intoxicating them with mind-altering drugs that have effects such as hindering rational thinking and increasing libido. The lab departments take bets on what kind of monster will attack the students and discuss the failures of international operations. In the cabin's cellar, the group finds bizarre objects, including the diary of Patience Buckner, a cabin resident abused by her sadistic family. Dana recites incantations from the diary and inadvertently summons the zombified Buckner family.


The lab employees, seeing that Dana is the only survivor, celebrate the success of the rite, but are interrupted by a phone call from "The Director", revealing that Marty is still alive. Marty saves Dana and takes her to a hidden elevator he discovered. They descend into the lab and discover a large collection of different monsters locked in cages. Dana correlates them with the objects in the cabin's cellar and realizes that the objects determine which monsters are released. Cornered by security personnel, the pair release all the monsters, which wreak havoc and slaughter the staff; Hadley is killed by a merman while Dana accidentally stabs Sitterson, who bleeds to death.


Deciding that humanity is not worth saving at the price of human sacrifices, Dana apologizes to Marty for almost killing him and the two share a joint while awaiting their fate. The temple floor collapses and a giant hand emerges from the ground, destroying the facility and the cabin as the world ends.


"The Cabin in the Woods" sets off with an ancient and familiar story plan. Five college students pile into a van and drive deep into the woods for a weekend in a borrowed cabin. Their last stop is of course a decrepit gas station populated by a demented creep who giggles at the fate in store for them. (In these days when movies are sliced and diced for YouTube mash-ups, I'd love to see a montage of demented redneck gas station owners drooling and chortling over the latest carloads of victims heading into the woods.)


Now in your standard horror film, that would be enough: OMG! The cabin is being controlled by a secret underground laboratory! Believe me, that's only the beginning. The film has been produced and co-written by Joss Whedon (creator of "Buffy the Vampire Slayer," "Angel" and other iconic TV shows) and directed by his longtime collaborator Drew Goddard (writer of "Cloverfield"). Whedon has described it as a "loving hate letter" to horror movies, and you could interpret it as an experiment on the genre itself: It features five standard-issue characters in your basic cabin in the woods, and we can read the lab scientists as directors and writers who are plugging in various story devices to see what the characters will do. In some sense, the Jenkins and Whitford characters represent Whedon and Goddard.


The plot of the film, on the surface level, is just about as predictable as any horror movie gets: Five college students fitting the standard horror-film character roles set out in a camper to spend the weekend in a creepy cabin in the woods, blissfully unaware of all the sinister signs that something terrible is about to happen. Gory and terrifying murders of the monstrous and supernatural varieties ensue. Even the name of the film itself is arguably a reference to the cookie-cutter nature of the horror tropes it is satirizing, as any of the dozens of such films taking place in a cabin in the woods are brought to mind by the title.


As Dana (Kristen Connolly) is being slowly beaten to death by her undead assailant, the facility workers are thrown into turmoil as they realize that one of the other campers is still alive, botching the as-yet-unexplained ritual the organization was attempting to complete. Marty (Fran Kranz), who previously had been dragged off and presumably murdered in the woods, suddenly returns and saves Dana, short-circuiting the "horror-movie ending" ending that had been carefully orchestrated from behind the scenes. Marty has discovered the entrance to the elevators used to transport the horror monsters up to the cabin, and he and Dana take the lift down to the unknown depths of the structure below.


Often in juxtaposition to the booze-fuelled antics of the young revellers The Cabin in the Woods returns us to the white-collar, cynical, and salaried Gary Sitterson (Jenkins) and Steve Hadley (Whitford) who lounge in their (at first) undisclosed location, where they banter and toil amidst a bank of TV screens which show closed-circuit surveillance footage of the cabin and environs where the blissfully unaware students party with abandon.


The Cabin in the Woods is a 2012 American horror comedy film directed by Drew Goddard in his directorial debut, produced by Joss Whedon, and written by Whedon and Goddard. The film stars Kristen Connolly, Chris Hemsworth, Anna Hutchison, Fran Kranz, Jesse Williams, Richard Jenkins, and Bradley Whitford. The plot follows a group of college students who retreat to a remote forest cabin where they fall victim to backwoods zombies, and the technicians who manipulate events from an underground facility.


The Cabin In The Woods is an American horror comedy about a group of college kids who spent a weekend in a mysterious cabin in the woods. Produced and directed by Goddard from a script by both, the film stars Kristen Connolly, Chris Hemsworth, Anna Hutchison, Fran Kranz, Jesse Williams, Richard Jenkins, and Bradley Whitford.


American college students Dana, Holden, Marty, Jules, and Curt are spending their weekend at a seemingly deserted cabin in the forest. From their control room, Sitterson and Hadley manipulate the students by intoxicating them with mind-altering drugs that hinder rational thinking and increase libido. They take bets from coworkers as to what kind of monster will attack the students and discuss the failures of similar rites in other nations.


In the cabin's cellar, the group finds many bizarre objects, including the diary of Patience Buckner, a cabin resident abused by her sadistic family. Dana recites incantations from the journal, inadvertently summoning the zombified Buckner family despite Marty's warnings. By releasing pheromones, Hadley successfully induces Curt and Jules to have sex. Attacked by the marauding Buckner zombies, Jules is decapitated while Curt escapes to alert the group. Marty, a frequent marijuana smoker, discovers concealed surveillance equipment before being dragged off by one of the Buckners. Later, the facility workers learn that the rite in Japan has also ended in failure, meaning that the American rite is humanity's last hope. It becomes apparent that the rite involves blood sacrifice.


Marty rescues Dana and takes her to a hidden elevator he discovered under a grave. They descend into the underground facility, where a menagerie of monsters is imprisoned. Dana correlates them with the objects in the cabin's cellar and realizes that those items gave victims the opportunity to choose the agents of their own deaths during the rite. Cornered by the facility's security personnel, she and Marty release the monsters, all of which wreak havoc and slaughter the staff; Hadley is killed by a merman and Sitterson escapes to the lower level.


They arrive at their weekend hideaway (unsurprisingly, a cabin in some woods) and life is good. The action switches from time-to-time to a large corporation which seems to be keeping tabs on our young protagonists. As the film progresses, their characters become more established in true horror style, with Jules worrying everyone with how slutty she has become (purely from a horror convention perspective) and Dana seeming to regress into virginity, although we know that she has recently had a relationship with one of her tutors. Cue birds-eye shots, atmospheric music and droplets of foreshadowing. The gang end up in the cabin cellar, which is clearly a bad idea and from then on in, you need to have the fingers of one hand free, through which to peep.


AFX Studio are responsible for the special effects, monster costumes, special makeup and prosthetic makeup and when the action moves from the cabin and its simple family of redneck zombies, we see their full capabilities. Considering that some of the shots are fleeting, there has been no expense spared in every possible monster from your worst nightmares.


But I think you have to know what kind of horror film it looks like at first, so I will tell you about how it establishes its stage at the beginning. Five college kids go to the cabin in some remote area which is recently purchased by the cousin of one of them, and there are many apparent bad signs they come across during their journey. The place is so remote that it cannot be found on GPS, and the road to the cabin has no guard rail to protect their camping car from the precipice next to it, and they also come across a gas station which looks as shabby as its unpleasant owner, who gives them a solemn warning about what will happen to them through his nonsense words.


And we come to see that the movie is essentially a joke on its genre. For some purpose revealed later in the story, the people at the facility try to have the kids in the cabin dispatched in the way we usually expect from horror films, and that makes them more or less than a screenplay writer or director who follows the rules of horror movies to force the characters to a pre-determined ending waiting for them in advance. The movie later goes further with an interesting thought on the free will of characters in fiction during its third act. Can it be said the characters in fiction have a free will even if they are already stuck in the story determined from the beginning? Can they affect their own fate? The movie pushes these questions with its uninhibited take-no-prisoner attitude, and that ultimately results in the playfully bloody climatic sequence which I can only describe as an orgy of horror films while not spoiling your entertainment. 041b061a72


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